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Jiu-Jiteiros C2C
Jiu-Jiteiros C2C

Episode · 8 months ago

Hard times create strong men feat. prof. James Kearns

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

The guys sit and talk military life and jiu-jitsu with Tactical Combat Academy of Mixed Martial Arts black belt Professor James Kearns. professor Kearns shares a story of pride, perseverance and triumph on this one. 

This is the motivation. Hey, everybody, welcome to another episode. Did you get devil's coast to coast, the podcast? It talks about what's important on and off the math. I'm frank. I'm joining on my cousin ant because how you doing this afternoon? I'm doing good, man, doing real good. I'm ex super excited about this, this talk we're going to have today. Are we have a guess that I've been really wanted to hear. that. His story and I met a few times and yeah, just like most of the guys that I've talked about, the gym, very inspirational. We've all kind of, you know, talked off the mats about like I mean, you wait to hear this story. I don't even want to give anything away, but you wait till you hear this story. So it's going to be. It's going to be exciting. So, professor, professor currents, how you doing today? Good. How are you? We're all doing good. We're all excited about you being on here. Yeah, thanks for having me. I appreciate I know the it's kind of hard to fit everybody schedule together, especially you over Thanksgiving and then Christmas coming up, though. I'm glad we could get this, get this to work out. So I appreciate you being flexible to no, no worries, no worries. Yeah, like we mentioned. Just thank you so much for taking a little bit of time out of your day to join this. Professor Curns, where exactly are you at right now? So I'm in Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, so I would be you guys are Wester someone's goes and that that was also part of the like the three hour delay, right, yeah, for three hour time difference. Yeah, so that makes scheduling tricky too. But yeah, well, thank you for joining the Jiujit they on neighborhood. I'm not sure if you're familiar with the rundown of our show. We've had black belts in the past and, like we like, we just want to share people stories. We just want to ask you guys, ask you a few questions, learn where you're coming from, learn about your game a little bit, tells your backstory and and we like to have fun. We cut it up a little bit on here, so we're not we don't take ourselves too serious and we like to have fun at the same time. So our staple question that we asked every single person that's been on this show. Do you have an all time favorite martial arts movie? We've had kill Bill, we've had obviously blots for what other movies have we had mentioned on here? Because the was it the Chuck Norris Movie? Oh Man, I don't know. There's been some. There's been sells follows part three somebody mentioned. Probably, yeah, don't even remember. So, professor, any favorite martial arts movie? I don't know is well, just so. Does a Matrix counts martial arts movie? Hey, it could be anything. Actually, it could be anything because in at like us right, muppet keeper saw. I mean, I don't know. Well, that's comes in mind. Heart like the I like the the Matrix. I mean I would I consider that martial arts movie. So I'm not sure. The first one any way, I don't know. The second to kind of cheesy. But yeah, what did you heard about them out? Yeah, that's why I just thoughted. I just saw that yester yesterday, I think, during one of the one of the College Football Games. It was on one of the previous or yeah, the pre before kind of got me thinking about it. I don't know. It looks the new one coming out looks pretty good. I didn't like the second and a third one, though. But yeah, but I don't know that that was a good king firm or come through martial arts movie, Jeversy, Kung Fu Hustle. O. Oh, yeah, there she is. I mean, I mean it's dumbed over, I mean or you. I mean you could do in subtitle, I guess, but I can't. There's no way I can read that fast. But that movie was awesome. I mean not, that was a good be my wife like that movie too. So yeah, I was. I always like that movies. Can I would have been in one like two thousand four or four, maybe if five. Yeah, some like that. Numb brings back memories right there. Wow, yeah, that was that was a good marshal. I mean that's definitely martial warts movie. So I mean I'll go with that or matrix something. There's a bunch of good there's a bunch of good martial warts movies. All right. Yeah, Babe, you could be anything that like it inspires the martial arts culture or gets you thinking kind of like in that mindset. You know, it doesn't necessarily have to be, yeah, like a kariate kid tip movie or anything. You know, what's that old s wrestling movie, Vision Class, vision quest. That's a great vision a martial arts movie. That's the moment he can to throw on and that's just going to get that's gonna pump you up. No, no, yeah, vision class, I mean because I found about that too, whenever, just know, whenever used about martial arts movie. I mean if you consider what, what exactly is martial arts, I mean wrestling, boxing is certainly martial arts. So I mean you could throw rocky in there, like the rocky, the first rocky. I that was one of my that was a great movie. I mean the other ones were there are other...

...ones are okay too, by the first one I thought was the best, like a freed yeah, I think. I think Mason Fowler mentioned that when he was on. He said he liked to he mentioned rocky as one of his favorite martial arts movies. I want to see. Yeah, well, that's what I'm saying. So, if you consider what exactly martial arts is, I mean boxing and wrestling certainly fallender there. But yeah, vision class. I was just talking to somebody the other day about vision quest. Yeah, I know. Oh, yeah, that's what I saw us. Yeah, movies real good and I know a guy, one of them, one of the guys that helped coach wrestling. His son's named after the one of the characters from vision quipt. So they were out because there he was out from the Pittsburgh Garry. So that was like a big deal. But yeah, that's a good movie. Yeah, that's a great movie. All Right, professor clearns, before we jump into your Jiujitsu career here, why don't you tell us about your military career? What branch did you serve and how long were you in? For sure I was. I was in the Marine Corps from two thousand to O four. So when I enlisted? Why? En listed when I was in high school. I think I was in hmm, I might have been twelveth grade, I remember right. I have my parents signed because I was only seventeen when when I'm listened. So they had to be my day of signs, my Guardian. But so I went in two thousand and obviously Oh one was and eleven. So that kind of change like basically change the landscape of the military at that point. So, but I was in there from two thousand to four and I was in mostly in motter transportation and landing support. So it was pretty pretty interesting time to be in. All right. So that was so you I don't go kind of jumped in. That was I just wanted to ask, like, you know, after you know, eleven happened. You know, a lot of people just kind of jumped win and signed up, but you were already in. What did you notice as that whole thing was just coming about? You know, what was it like being in the military already during that time? If you don't mind, chant that's what I mean. It was. It was really strange. So I was doing they I was doing a twenty four hour duty, so I was like twenty four on, twenty four off. So the problem with that is like your sleep gets really messed up because you're up for twenty four hours then you're off for twenty four hours. So you try and sleep a little bit when you it off in the morning, but you don't want to sleep too much, so you can try and sleep a little bit at night. So message your sleep up. And so I was just coming off the twenty four hour, twenty four on, twenty four off. I just got finished with my chief and one of my roommates had he had a phone in the barracks which not many people had a telephone in the bear like I'll he had. He actually had a landline, so he had a phone number. And they're all they all go to work. So they all go to the down to the motor pool in the morning and I'm on duty so or I just got off duties. I'm supposed to be sleeping and the phone just keeps ring like, I mean, I forget what time was. It might have been, I don't like whenever all this all happened, like in the morning, so like some thirty thirty, something like that. The phone just keeps ringing. I was like what is getting it's my roommates phone. So I don't even know if my family members had had the phone number. But think up the phone and it's I think it's his girlfriend or his sister something crying looking for him, and I'm just like I've no idea what's going on. And I'm like, yeah, he's at work. I mean it's like eight in the morning. So I'm like, you's at work out time become we gets back. So I hang up the phone. Then the phone rings again, and that's and then it rings again. I'm like what is going on? So I started looking arouss. Start to look out to one of his I can hear people talking because we lived in a barracks was like a quad, so it's a big courtyard, and people were forming, getting in the formations and stuff in the court yard and I was like what is going on? And everybody's home, for everybody's back already in the morning from the motorble and usually nobody comes back till maybe lunchtime and then like after they get off around whatever, five thirty or six in the evening. And I'm like, what is going on? Why is is everybody here, because I'm supposed to be sleeping? And I go in and look in the barracks, one of the other rooms and they have a TV, which most people in the barracks don't have a TV. They're like they don't have cable. I should say we all have TV's, but it's for like watching movies and stuff, but not many people actually have cable. And I go in this little time barris room. There's going to be twenty marines in there and I'm looking there all watching this TV and it's planes going into the tower and I'm just this is all catching me like right now I'm just hearing about this all for the first time. I'm like, is this going on right now? I mean, I'm totally confused. And then it all starts. That's why my roommates, family members were calling, like they were all watching this in real time on the news, and I'm like trying to sleep, thinking they're trying to interrupt me from sleeping stuff. But yeah, it was pretty it was pretty crazy. And then we had obviously we had locked down for twenty four or forty eight hours, I forget what it was, so nobody could leave the base and let me come come on base. Nobody was supposed to be out of their barracks. You go the PX and it was just a mile long. People are trying to get beer in the PX before everybody sells out. So, because everybody knows what's going on, won't. So it...

...was pretty wild and I mean, like I said, I had no clue what was going on. But then, like you kind of said before about people, I guess that spurred a lot of people into joining them or joining after that. So there was a big influx of people coming in after eleven and and they even change the way the GI bill operates after that too, because I was originally on the Montgomery Gi bill and then at some point you got changed to the Post Eleven Gia bill, which was way better than the GIB bill I had. Oh yeah, yeah, so, well, luckily I was able to transfer because I was in school then and I was coming to the end of my ten years, because you don't have ten years to use the Montgomery Gi bill and I was like a year nine, so I needed a roll and enroll in school and then they would transition me into the post nine eleven Giab Bill. So and then once I transitioned to that, it was a that was way better. But yeah, it was. There's a ton of ton of people jumped in because there were all everybody's don't be were pissed off and like there's just a gigantic influx of people coming in. But yeah, it was pretty wild. Thinking you mean like I mean watching about outside. It was like a movie. Well, you mean outside or like being in like while you're actually in the service of that point? Is that where you're talking about? Are you talking about like just watching it at home on TV? Yeah, I've just talked about watching it at home on TV. Just as as everything's unfolding. I was. I just kept telling myself, like this is a movie, this can't be real, but you guys are ready, like you're there. You know, yeah, I know, I know. Idea what was going on. I was like what is what is going on here? Yeah, everybody's, everybody's in the barracks and I was the early loss, like I was going to last people to find out about it, and I was like, oh, that's not good. And so, but then everybody, and then Parris, was going crazy, though, because everybody, like the rings is kind of different, I guess, like everybody was everybody thought we were getting sent it over like tomorrow. So, like, I mean, it was getting it was wild. Everybody's getting their gear ready. So no one was sure what was going on. There anything that you missed? You miss about the military or back back when you're in? Well, I mean the easy answer is, like I missed the people, like I had great friends when I was in. I mean maybe not, maybe not the greatest morale characters, but I mean I still I still touch base with a bunch of guys. Like I haven't seen anybody for a while. So it's been it's been a while since I've seen any by week there's a group was who've tried to get together before and it just it just doesn't work out. But I mean, so that's the easy answer. Is, like I missed some of the lot of the people, like a lot of a lot of great friends when I was in and sometimes you're only with those guys for thirty days or sixty days too, so that's it. You like never hear from them again either. But I also one thing that was extremely evident as soon as I got out. So because I got out on a Friday and then I went to work on when I came home, I came back to Pennsylvania then and I immediately went to work on a Monday and I started doing electrical contracting, and like it was pretty obvious to like the discipline issue was was gone, like there just was none. So I mean even now, like that's that's definitely the thing that that I miss, because I do a lot of discipline in my life. There's always been discipline in my life and like once I got out, I mean I missed that immediately. There's just was no the discipline was gone. I mean anyway, somebody could basically anybody could say something they want to do. It they're not going to do it. I mean it's just you know, like but yeah, so that that that was evident immediately, I mean as soon as I got out. But I definitely miss that. So I would say the friends I had when I was in and definitely the discipline. So I like going to feel to that was always fun. Like being good on deployments were fun. So, but I've had I've had enough of that. I mean I don't care you, I don't care to go. I'm not a big vacation guy more either. But so, but I've had my fill that. But yeah, I like that's what I missed them most. So yeah, I can totally. I totally understand when you talk about like we've had a lot of veterans on here and a lot of them always say like the Brotherhood, you know, you know, like you know some of the friendships they made. But that's that's one thing that you mentioning the whole discipline game out and that you're the first person to actually mention that. But I agree with you. Yeah, and you get out, you really you see that. That was something that it was kind of shocker to me too as well when I got out. You know, you're used to people. I think he dropped out there, but he should be back. Sure. Let's just go ahead and move on to the next question, professor. So the next question was describe you, and I'm still talking military life here, describe your first old Shit. What the fuck did I get myself into? More it could be something from boot camp, something out in the field. Maybe that day, I mean you talked a little bit about nine and eleven and going through...

...that whole day. That was that was, you know, pretty crazy. But what was your income to the real nation? Like, full crap, in August a new for so not. Eleven was a little over a year later. So I already had plenty of moments before that. But honestly, like it was probably, I mean probably the second day of boot camp. I mean I knew what to expect as far as like the yellow footprints and all that and drone structures coming and storm in the bus. But so it was probably the second day. So because you just get off the bus, you get your hair cut, you call your parents and you can they give you like a like a piece of paper. It has one sentence on it and that's what you're allowed to call your parents and they answer like two am and you say, I mean, I arrived at Parris Island and I am safe, for something like that. You got hang up the phone and that's it, and that's it, because any do how it is now. I mean I think it's a little different now. And then after that you don't see him until like thirteen weeks later, like three months later, like you don't talk to him again because you couldn't use a phone or anything. But so, so you do that and then you go straight to processing. So you got to get all your gear and then by the time you actually get to in your rack that evening, you've pretty been up for twenty plus hours and it had a like extremely stressful day. And I'm not a good sleep I've never been a good sleeper ever. Like I can hear the key hit the lock, you know, I mean when I'm sleeping. So, but the first night I was there, I mean I was out, I mean I lay down and just went to sleep immediately, and then all of a sudden open my eye, open my eyes, and my drill instructor, well, he wasn't, he was the processing drone instructor, because we had a wait where they're a wait a week early and they have to wait till all the betuns build up before they can send you through. And so I go to sleep and then inside out of my eyes and he is screaming at me, in my face, grabs me, drags me out of the rack, pulls me out in the middle of the squad bag and I look around and everybody else is already standing in line, like they're all lined up and I'll shoot because I never look up. Like they came in there reveli lights on, everybody got dressed, everybody's on the line, like whenever you do more in the morning, you do your accountability. See everybody lines up. I never heard any of this, like I I was just sing just laying my mouth look completely passed out, which is Thohne, not typical. Like I said, like I do, I do not sleep well at all. Like I hear, like I can hear the dog walking around, I can hear the dishwasher turn on like downstairs. I mean it wakes me up. So, I mean when that happened, I was like, Oh, I okay, that's on now. I guess so, but yeah, that would have been that would have been the first. That's when I knew that, I knew it was on, and that's I mean then I have I had about a hundred of them since then to so, but that would be pretty basically day one. But yeah, wow, that's that's wow. What a feeling. What a feeling, professor, what do you wish that civilians knew or would practice like in their normal life? I think you kind of hit on it one earlier, but is there anything that you want to put out there, like, what do you need? You know, annoying are any lack of discipline is huge. Lack of accountability is gigantic and really the one thing I don't think people that aren't there, never were in the military or even like any paramilitary like law enforcement or anything like that. When you're in a military, I mean you just do what you're told, like if somebody tells you to do something, you do it. That's it. There is no I don't feel like or it's cold outside, or you know, I mean like already been I already did this last week, or I didn't sleep very good less, like you just do. If you're told to do it, you do it right. Well, that's that was always been frustrating, but it's just it's like that everywhere. It's like just society and in general, like people just don't do what they're supposed to do. Just do it, like it's make that. So yeah, I don't understand. It's just could not be easier like me and not doing it and like refusing to do it and coming up with all these reasons why I'm not going to do it. That takes way more effort than just doing what you're supposed to do in the first boys right. So, yeah, that's one thing I wish that would, that people would that would people would do that they did in the military that they just don't do like in normal civilian life. There's just always a reason why not and I don't feel like it, so I'm not going to do it. Like but yeah, that's super fastrating, man. I'm not saying everybody's like that either. So, but there there's a lot. There's a lot of people like that. That's and I'm not saying that not everybody in the military does what they're told either. There's I mean there's always like your little you're like Turd company, so you're like terrible tunes of your company,...

...and then you have people that are like world bullger and stuff like that, and they always kind of get flushed down to the one will tune the very end, and I like that whole tune is just fool like guys that are just like basically there to cause problems. So I mean that exists everywhere, but it's certainly more prevalent, I mean outside of the mild. Yeah, all right, professor, we're going to switch gears here. We're going to start talking about some Jiu Jitsu. Will Your first introduction to Jiujitsu? Well, my first intro ever would be well, would have been in the Marine Corps whenever we did like make map, and that's super base, like like Marine Corp Martial Arts Program. I mean that's super basic. It's like like Camra and Armbar and were naked choke and stuff like that. But I mean I understood stood the JI like the importance of it then, but when I got out, once I got out, so I got out of new floor and I was like man, I need something to do, like what? What? Now? Because when I was in the Marines we would you wouldn't get off, you wouldn't get off of work. Basically we wouldn't leave the motor pool till like the evening, like it basically be right before Chol Hall closed. So by time we got a Chol Hall and then we would go to the gym because I still always worked out when I was in Rink Corps, we got a gym. It's like thirty here clock at night and then as soon as I'm out of the Marines and then I'm just working a regular job, I get off work at thirty. I give the gym and I'm done working out and I'm home and it's like four o'clock, like well, now what I want of my list supposed to do now? So I was like, well, I know what I was like, I know what I'll do. So I actually got involved in boxing and Taykeewon go first and only did a little bit of Jiu Jitsu because just availability there wasn't a lot around the area. But I did do there was a guy there who he work for the railroad and he did you did you Jutsu every now and then and I think he was a blue belt at the time. So but this was still in five so I mean there wasn't many, really that many guys anywhere, and he would help me out a little bit and I was probably my first like real experience with actual Jiu Jitsu, with more triangles, sweet things like that. You're not just like, besides, we're naked, choke and camera. And then I did that for a little bit. But then when I went down and I went down to Greencastle, Pennsylvania, a friend of mine, he told me about a gym down there. There's this guy and his name was Josh homer and hit a gym and now he was doing jiujitsu classes. So now this was the first time I ever really and this would have been this wasn't this would have been an o six, o seven, oh six or o seven, and now these were actual jiujitsu classes. So now I was all noogie, very heavy wrestling based, because in Pennsylvania, I mean like, if you're going to do no gie in Pennsylvania, you better learn how to wrestle. You either better no, you should either know how to wrestle or you got to learn how to wrestle. So the gym was very heavy wrestling base. So a lot of wrestlers were there, a lot of law enforcements there, and so that would have been my real first exposure to like like fool classes, like actual Jiu Jitsu class. So that I said like six or seven around there. But yeah, and that was before we didn't get probably two years, three years later maybe, until we had a gay program. But so it was cool. So I actualized me. I started out doing noogie first. So let me I school. So what what made you keep coming back? So I always I like the physical contact. I mean, I don't want to I don't want to incriminate myself, but when I was in cool, or I mean we, we would fight a good bit. Like we weren't fighting every day, but everybody just fought everybody, like when you would go out in town and it was all the same idiots fighting each other too. It was all we're all everybody's fighting other marines, like even in other places like album out in town. So and I always liked it, like it was usually we did well. Sometimes we didn't do the great hits, but even then, like it wasn't a big deal. We which kind of laugh about it after the fact. But so always liked the physical aspect of just like martial arts in general and just like grappling boxing. It's always liked it. But I always understood immediately that I'm not going to get any better because I wanted to be better at this point, like I didn't want to just go in and just fight people just because, like that's so. I just I wanted to be better. And when I started taking actual Jiujitsu classes with guys have been doing it longer than I have, and particularly people have been wrestling for ten years, fifteen years. Guys are wrestling college. I mean I was getting my ass kick there in the beginning. I mean there's my guys. I mean I was probably, I mean I've been ever anywhere from two hundred and sixty five pounds to a hundred, like eighty five pounds. So I mean even when I started doing my first Jiujitsu classes, I was about two hundred and twenty five, probably, and I mean I'm getting ragged all about like a hundred and...

...seventy pound beligia wrestlers and I'm like, you know, this kind of sucks, but this is one of this is why I need like this. I'll get better. I'm not going to get better just like beating other people, you know. I mean, like so I might sound like kind of I don't know, the kind of like jar headed a show, I guess, but like I enjoyed when people were able to beat me. So that's what kept me coming back, like I gotta figure out how to beat this guy now now, like this next part is like a two part or question. So I mean for audience and you, a lot of people. They they're getting to know you right, you know, doing this podcast, getting know you in this kind of real talk. Now, when I met you, I met you and you had lost your leg. Now, how is that like? I mean when I met you and I met you, like I said, you watched you had you didn't have your leg, but it did not like seeing you on the Mat. I member you were teaching a section and it was like like it did, like you didn't even ease you like it did. And most people, I can just imagine, they go through something like that, to lose a limb or something. You know, they might quit or do you know the struggle or any but it just, you know, eight I you don't see that from you. You just you're you're just like it. I don't know even know how to say it. Like you, it did not stop you at all. Like how is how do you overcome that? Like tell us a little bit about that. Yeah, I was a I mean I was a brown bell was like a my second year, second or third year as a brown belt, whenever I lost my leg. So like I had a blow of the knee amputation on my left leg because I had a just like a really like a really weird blood disease, a just he my bone marrow cannot regulate how much red blood cells it produces, so it's just dumps red blood cells out, which just caused blood plots everywhere. So it's just a really weird it's like a really weird disease. So yeah, honestly, like people have asked me out before, I mean I don't want to say that it didn't affect me at all, but there's a lot of things that go into it. Number One, like the way my game was like. So I was in my second or third year, I brown belt, and I mean I'm competing all the time and training all the time, so I like I have a firmly established in my game plan, and one thing I did help was, like I'm a total top layer, always on top, so I go for takedown, passing and pressure submission, like it's the game plan is always the same. So that kind of helped to transition, honestly, because if I was, I mean if I'm doing spider guard and jumping guard all the time, that would be a lot more tricky, because that is that is the issue. When I get if I can stay on top, I'm still okay and I can still scramble good. The real tricky part is if I get put on my back, especially like side control, if I'm in like if I have somebody my opponent is on top side control, that's a challenge. So, like, if I was doing like spiderguard, any type of the pell guard or anything like that, that, I would be a huge challenge. But it wasn't the biggest transition ever to go from staying on the like staying on top, but it definitely is a transition. So, I mean, I gave myself one year when I when I knew it was going to happen, I was like, wow, I'll give I'll give it a year, because what I don't want to do is like kind of be that guy that goes down the mad and everybody, everybody's just like Oh, like Lee, like I'm not to do that, like it's just not possible. So I was give myself a year because I knew there was going to be a big learning curve. So I pulled myself. I didn't get this. If I wasn't competitive in a year, like I'm not saying I need to be dominant, because, I mean, I mean, I was winning. It was it would be quite a while before I would lose a match before. So I'm not saying like it's got to be like that because, I mean, I live in reality. So, but what it can be is, like I'm just getting blown out of water every match, like it's got to be. I got to be competitive. So if I'm in division, there's I got to be able to win. Like that doesn't mean I'M gonna I'm gonna win, but as long as I can stay competitive in and possibly win, then I'm good. Like I already decided that because I had about, well, I don't know, like four days before, like when I knew I had to give my leg amputated to kind of product the process all this. So that's what I gave myself, like the timeline I gave myself, and I was like, if I'm not competitive, if I'm just kind of flopping around on the Mat...

...and I'm getting rung up every time, I go out there, I'm not going to keep doing it. So I mean I'll find because I'm pretty competitive, so I'll find something else to do or something like that. But I gave myself a year. But besides that, I mean I kind of touched on before about the one of the issues outside the military is the lack of discipline. I mean, I'm a very disciplined person with regards to well, with everything pretty much. I mean diets, always been disciplined, my workouts, my match training, at everything. So I mean, even if from when I was a kid, like my dad was a disciplinarian and my mom was a disciplinarian, so that equals a lot of discipline when I was so I mean that's been established like from the beginning. So I went from that into the Marine Corps, which is four years of nothing but discipline. So I mean I had a really, really strong foundation of discipline. I also had a really good support system. So my I've been with my wife for yeah, this year was our seventeen anniversary. We've been together for over twenty years. ADULATIONS, you know. Thanks. So and she's always been great, like because, I mean, like you guys know, like whenever you get involved and something real heavy, especially like martial wars and Jiu Jitsu and MMA, like I'm gone. There would be some I mean, I'll be gone for the weekend here, I'll be gone for the weekend there, and there's also a financially, like I cost some money too. She's always been extremely supportive, so that I mean I'd always help. I mean, as soon as I knew this was happening, I knew that things happen for a reason, like I was raised in the church, very strong foundation, very strong Christian Foundation, and I knew this was happening for a reason. So now, like I knew that God was making this. This was like his decision. This was happening for a reason. I mean it took me a whild, like. I mean, I didn't say I was a green with this decision or I don't, like I was like me, I don't know about this, but it's kind of like but once you want to stand, like once I understood that and like like what am I going to do? Like it is what it is like. So I had all that, all that together. So it's kind of almost like the perfect storm. I mean, I don't want to say if somebody's gonna like lose their leg and continue to go forward, like it would be me. But like I had a lot, a lot behind me. That kind of made this a lot easier, and some people, just a lot of people, are just not that fortunate, you know. I mean. So it's kind of weird to because people will ask me to talk to people that like who've liked lost limbs and or kind of depressed and stuff like that, and I guy, I got people. Actually, last I was down in Charlotte, for that be jeff of that down there like Tom and a guy came up to me and he just lost his like just started training Jiu Jutsu. So that was cool. Like he wanted to talk and stuff, and I'm always I'm not really sure what to say, because everybody's background is was way different, you know. I mean, like my background was, my background could not have been stronger or better for this to happen. You know me now, I'm not one of those guys either that's like, Oh, this is changed my life and my life is better. Like I would give two of my fingers they have my us lay back here. I mean like so I'm not going that far either. So, but I mean just so it's kind of it's not even anything I really worry about now, something something that crosses my mind, you know. I mean if I can, if I'm on the Mat, and even like when I go to the classes and stuff like that, sometimes people be like Hey, do you care if we work on this, because I was going to go over this. I didn't know you were coming, and we're doing like leg lasso or something like that. More like leg entanglements, the Dan a horror system. We're doing leg entanglements. I'm always like don't, don't change anything at all because of me, like I can either do it or I can't do it, like it's that it's that easy. If I can do it, like I'm messing around and figure something out like so, but I mean it's so now it's not something I even it's not something I worry about. I mean I've always been kind of ready to go as soon as I knew, as soon as I, like I said, I had about a four day window where I knew. I knew I was gonna have to have my leg amputated, and once I kind of got over that,...

I started like planning on how I was going to get back immediately, like I got to be competitive. I got to work on this because I'm probably going to get put on my back more and I give myself a year. So that was it. So now it's not even something I worry about. So Oh, I mean, oh at all. What would you what would you a credit to helping you do it? I mean you mentioned a few things of like overall, what would you be to say that number one thing would be helped you do all of it? HMM, that's a good question. Well, I mean they're, like I said, I kind of have a perfect form, but honestly, it's once, when I said before, like like I don't think things just happened just because, like things happen for a reason and sometimes they're just sometimes the reasons totally suck to like I'm not saying that at all, but like if God has a plan and this is what has been decided, like whatever, like there's not really there's really not much I can do. So once I'd like kind of accepted that fact. That made everything much easier. So I already know there's really nothing I can do about it. So now just keep going forward, and now gives other people a chance to to roll with you. Oh, yeah, I mean, yeah, I think people are a little surprised to whenever I'm rolling because they're not really sure. I'm really sure what it like. I do. I do have an advantage, like I try and take take advantage of like whenever I compete against somebody that doesn't know who I am, because we got about so if here we got about like a twenty eight to thirty second window where he's not sure exactly how to approach them. Like the guys people I roll with their they're standing up on both legs all the time. So it's nothing new for me, you know. I mean, so it's I do. I try and take advantage of that. But now I think people are from the most sport. They're pretty surprised because, I mean, I I still done well. Well, you know, honestly, if I could so kind of backtrack and answer quick wells, the one thing that really helped out was having success after it was over. It's like so, if, because reality is, if I wasn't being if I didn't have any success in that year after my invitation, I just want to kept doing it, like I wouldn't be here, I wouldn't be still competing. That's the reality. So what really helped out as when I had success, because I say I probably I mean I don't get nervous at all, like I mean I get ready to go, like I don't need to be getting I don't need to get himped up by any means before I compete. You know what I mean? Yeah, like I'm ready to roll, I'm ready to go, but I wouldn't know what. It's not nerves by any means. Like I don't get nervous, I get excited, I mean, but I don't get nervous or anxious. Maybe anxious is made a better way to phrase it, like I don't get anxious. But when I hit my first tournament, I went down to Richmond, Virginia, and that's what I would have been, excuse me, my first tournament after I had my amputation. So I got the green light to start training about three months after my invitation. So then it was on. I started training, start in drill and start roll alive, and then like eight months later I had my first tournament. So from the day and my invitation, it was like eight months to the day. First torment back I was nervous, like that was the first time I ever remember. Probably beside since my like first year ever competing in martial arts, because, I mean, I've competed another martial arts outside of Jiujitsu to so, but at that this is the first time, because my wife went with me because she wasn't sure, like just it was a first time competing, like I wasn't sure what to expect, like what happens about my big and Sert of what happens Abo like blew my other knee out or like broke my right ank or something like that. You know, I mean that I'm really screwed. So I need somebody's help. So, but yeah, I was really nervous because I just wasn't sure how it was going to go. But one of my first match exactly how I have won ninety percent of all my other matches before previously. And then I lost my second match, but it was kind of like I was so relieved that when that my first match back that I wasn't super I wasn't super concerned about that second man, but I really set the pace. I was like it, Oh, I can do this, is this will work, like I can still be competitive with this. So once I had once I was successful. That's what really like can be gone. So I guess I don't know if that's maybe a better answer,...

...but I kind of backtrack a little bit. But yeah, because if I were the really is, if I would have went out there and basically got like a got my ass kicked across the Mat my first my first mash back, like I might be like that. It's I'm sort of tell who might be done. But do you think that the a background and rain ground wouldn't let you really do that? I mean because, hearing like your stories and everything, you think that if you had got in beating that marine, that marine instinct in you, whatever they Nah, I'm coming back. That's a good point because I can say here now and say that, because that's a hypothetical because I was like like three and a half years ago. So I can kind of like say, well, if it did happen, yeah, I mean, but honestly, the more time more to think about it right now, I probably would have just got fur its like super pissed for like two weeks and then just probably would have came right rate, came right back and been a terrible training partner that everybody in the gym, because I just be cross space. Some people to death. But well, I think about that, that's probably what would have happened. I probably would have got furious. So now that's a good point. Well, I've definitely seen your I've seen your videos and man, it has not stopped you. Man, as I've seen something like the takedowns. I get your tournaments this up and man what a hurting on them big time. Yeah, thanks. Yes, same thing, I guess. Again, like I talked about the perfect storm too. That's like that's still my game and nothing in my game has changed, period, nothing. So, I mean it's still hat down, pressure, pass, submit, same time. It just does doesn't change. So, like I said, I'm very fortunate, like I'm not like a lapel player or like rely on a whole bunch of lapel guards or lasso or x guard and stuff like that, because then I would just have to reevaluate weight everything because, like I said, I mean I was already my second or third year as a brown belt, like I maw, like I say, you can't teach an old dog new trips, I guess. But I mean we're pretty far down the pretty far down the Ju just your journey to be totally reinventing my game. At this point. But yeah, so, yeah, I appreciate it. Still same thing. Well, professor, I was going to add ask you know about your Jiujitsu journey and it was its smooth sailing or was it pretty you know, did you have your hits? But, Holy Crap, man, losing a leg being so far into the game, into your Jiujitsu career, your journey where you just mentioned it. You know what I mean. You by the time you get to Brown belt, you kind of already feel your game out and you already know what you're going to be doing. You just mentioned it. It's no matter what your game plans always the same, because in that kind of hit on the nail when he's mentioned, maybe your marine background would have kicked in and it didn't. Let you give up. But it feels like that's you, just your character. You're like that. You know what, we're in this mess and there's nothing I can do about what's happening other than how I react to it. What kind of advice would you give to people that are like, I don't know, or maybe they're just not sure you know. Yeah, well, I mean, the best advice I can give is you'll either do it or you won't do it, like, but if you never try it out, you're not going to know. So I mean I could have easily. there. Would been easy because I don't think anybody would blame me if I if I called my carriage is as like hey, I got your mom getting my light cut off in like three days. I think I'm out, I'm done, I'm done training. I don't think anybody would have been I think everybody would understood, honestly, like that's kind of sucks. So but like if I if I didn't, if I didn't try it out, I mean I never know. So you can here to kind of just sit it and feel bad about it, or you can just go do it. I mean, I know, I hate to sound like super blunt or insensitive, but I mean the legs not coming back, you know. I mean like if I could sit here, I can sit here and complain about it for the next ten years and feel miserable and not do Jiujitsu or lift or anything else. or I mean like that doesn't change any thing. I still have lost one of my legs, or I can just go and do it. Like not nothing changes, like the only thing that changes is what I decide to do. That's it. Like, like I said, importantly, it's be on. It's not coming back. So while I am I going to sit here and...

...just feel sorry for myself, like I'm not saying either that you shouldn't be like be depressed at all. You know, I mean like, like sure, I mean, that's I mean, I was pretty disappointed when I figured out, when I heard what was going to have to happen. I mean, but you got to keep going. Like what are you going to do? Just sit around and do nothing forever? But you'll never know unless you try to do it. I mean, if it doesn't work out, doesn't work out, like if I, like I said, if I would, if I couldn't, if I couldn't get this going, like there's there's something else I can do, like I got to be competitive in something. So there's there is something you can do. I mean, like, if it's not this, it can be something else. But again, you're not going to know that unless you try. But like you can't. It's kind of one of those like I don't know, I want you guys left or anything like that. But so I did personal training for a long time and when I talk to like friends or other people like that are like I'm going to start, I'm going to start working out on and then they give you the date, like you know, I mean, like, worry, January. Second, I'm going to start working at like it's like December, whatever. What was today? November one, twenty eight. Like well, why don't you just start working out tomorrow when? He Yeah, like so why you put it to just go do it, like you got to just go do it. So I don't know, like somethime I might seem a little little insensitive, I guess, but no, it's real talk right there. Definitely, and I mean I've seen recently what you maxed out. You did your Max on your your square right. Well, your squat, your dead. There's like four few pounds. Well, both, like we're so injuries is always an issue. So, I mean, I'm always, I'm always still, like, I mean I'm ten years personal training. I mean I'm I have a health and visit education certification. I mean my bachelor's is in wellness and fitness and sports management. So I know like how bad maxing out for you is, but I mean four years of being the Marine Corps, like I just can't want if I'm feeling good and we just started leading some plates on. We're going like I'm even the whole time I'm doing it. I know it's Tera, I know it's dumb, like I shouldn't be doing it, but now, yeah, so we went up there and I think it was I think four hundred and twenty five on, four hundred and twenty five on squad and yeah, for four hundred and twenty five on squad and then five hundred on deadlift and then three and twenty five bench, which. So, I mean, I know that I shouldn't be. I shouldn't be doing it, but like I got to do some of the some of the reasons for squatting now is because that's one thing I do get. Like I'm not a real great like motivational speaker or anything like that, because I think it's like maybe that might be a little different rink. It was like a little too to blunt. But one thing I do know that I have gotten messages before about whenever I do squats and stuff like lower body, lower body work. I do get, if I put it like two or three videos up, I'll get a message about somebody that'll say something like I wasn't going to do anything. Came across your video. That was awesome. So now I'm not here, I'm out of here walking, so stuff like that. So I can do that. That's easier for me to do. So I do. I do think like maybe squatting heavy does serve a serve a purpose other other than you go now. I mean I know to this like is it harder? I mean, obviously it's got to be harder, but I mean what's it feel like? Because, I mean you're doing squats and everything like that before and now you're doing it with the prosthetic. Like how is it different? Well, the differ different. Bag. The biggest difference is ankle flection. So, like my ankle is like a prosthetic ankle now looks like a like a ball. So there's no flection. So like if you if you're just staying there and you see and you just squat down like do like an air squat, your ankle flexes. The have ankle flection and then your knees will come past your toes, like as you're squating down, like your knees will break that plane and come past your toes. So it does that on my right leg, but on my left leg. It doesn't because, like I'm missing half my legs, so there's no flection. So I have to be on my toes, which if you do any like lower body work and moderately heavyweight, you know that you cannot be on your toes. You're like your heel needs to be driving through the ground. Right when I'm squatting, what I'm doing back squuats, I have to make up for that lack of ankle flection by my heel coming up off the floor and my toes leaning...

...forward. And well, that does is cause a massive amount of instability. So if you look, so I do have some videos up. I think we're my knee really buckles like it's weird to like. I'll when I can get in the zone. I know when it's going to like my first rap it'll be good. My Foot placement's right and I'm able to make up for that. But then sometimes, out of nowhere, my knee just wabbles and bows in or shoots out because I can't I just can't control that flection very well. So it's definitely causes some major stability issues. That's that's man, that's amazing, professor. So coming off with different coming do you have any favorite matches, Jiujitsu matches that you've, you know, seen right over there over the time? Really think of one standing out that better than other? I mean there's a lot of there's a lot of matches that are really good. I mean it's hard to put the thing about, like the Jiujitsu and any grappling. I'm there's just so many too, like it's you can think of like hey, you remember that the greatest football game you ever solved? Like Oh, yeah, because there's only a couple of them a year, you know. I mean we're talking about Jiu Jitsus, some Mession, submission wrestling, whatever. I mean, there's so many. Yes, so many you could pick from. I don't know how I would say. I don't know how good they are, but basically Maddie match with Gordon Ryan is pretty those are always pretty memorable, honestly. So like Gordon Gordon Rhyme matches, Philippa Penia matches, those are always really good. Gary Tone and matches, those are always really good, real, real fast paced. And what's that guy? I just watched them. We had some guys doing the east coast trials a couple weeks ago and I saw cootie steel. Your see how he's down from like from Texas. Yeah, he's us that. He's fun to watch. Yeah, his matches are cool. Yeah, he's getting into MV. I don't know if you saw. I think he had a fight last week. I see won by like think I got a chaos or something, some guy in the dirt. Yeah, yeah, that's all. You're absolutely right. He's fun to watch. Yeah, like. So, so I want to say there's like one specific matches. There's just if there's a certain guy, cause he's just scrambles like crazy. So the matches are great. So, but I mean, I don't know if there's one. I mean there I guess that you could always say that Gary Tone and Crown Gracie match, like that's the old ATC match like that one's pretty crazy. That was a good one. Yeah, some of the old Marcello Garcia AC matches or they're pretty crazy to always like the one with him and Rico Rodriguez. That was a great that's that's definitely an old timer for sure. Yeah, that was actually my first Jiujitu tournament. My buddy was like hey, let's go watch this tournament down in Long Beach and it ended up being ATCC and we got to see Marcelo in that match. Sounds cool. Oh, yeah, that's all. That's cool. Yeah, that's real cool. Well, coach, that's the last question we had for you. Is there anything else you want to ask, cuz before we get wrapped this episode up now, man, I think I think I've asked too many questions, too many questions. Well, I actually have one more question, and we talked about this in the last episode, coach. This has to do with takedowns. You mentioned takedowns. That was bes always been a part of your game plan. We just brought this up because, I want to say someone mentioned it on a on a, on INSTA or on face book or something. But what do you think about takedowns being worth only two points? You think there should be worth more? Let's yeah, me personally, I mean I've won a lot of matches to zero so and that just basically tells you I'm won by a takedown. Honestly, I think personally, I think two points is good. I like the two point, the two points. My only issue is getting the two points. So that has been one of the biggest challenges for me personally, because I live by the takedown and most organizations will not give me two points for takedown if I start on my knee, which, like one am I going to do? I got to be on my knee. So I don't, I guess, like I mean perfect sweep singles in the center of the Mat and get no points. So for me, if I can even get those two points I'm being that would be great. But I mean,...

I've got some exclamations before and they don't hold water burst to me personally. But now I think two points is good. I mean, I guess when you consider about a guard pass, most places is three amount is for to be able to control a match like that. I mean I could see with there's organizations that gave it three points, I mean kind of on par with passing the guard. Because what if you can take the guy down and you can't pass his guard, or if the Guy Pulls Guard and then you just pass it because he can't do anything and he gets three right. So you can make I mean that's basically if you don't, if you take some way down and can't pass. I mean, I mean I could you can make a case for three points, but I think two points is good. But for me personally. I mean, if I can't even get two points, I'd be I'd be great. So just make sure they give us the two. Hey, I mean, I you if you want to give me three, hey, I mean I'll take the worry. I'll say for to that's fine. Hey, the more the Merrier, all right, because anything you want to say before we end this up and this episode? Yeah, I just wanted to think professor currents are coming out and just being on our show. A lot of good information and really good happening you on the show, so I really appreciate you taking time out of your day. I know it's your you got a strict schedule with the family and Jiujitsu and working on anything, so don't want to keep you from that, but thank you so much for taking time to being on the show. Thanks for having me appreciate it. Yeah, thank you so much, professor currents, for joining us today. It's always a huge honor having a military vet as well as a black belt. Thank you for sharing your Jiujitsu journey with us. Awesome inspirational stories. Thank you so much. Hopefully everyone out there and podcast land enjoyed this episode. Check out a website you got a little bit of time. WWW DOT jujitl s to seecom, where you can find all our content, including our new and upcoming blog, where we're going to be letting you guys know all the upcoming grappling tournaments and super fight events coming your way. So that's now. Next time, Jiuji DEILS, keep rolling and training and we hope to hear from you. So peace. This is the motivation.

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