Jiu-Jiteiros C2C
Jiu-Jiteiros C2C

Episode · 2 months ago

Veterans Day episode- Mental Health & Veteran Non-Profits in BJJ

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

On this Veterans Day episode the guys have a real discussion on mental health, suicide and handful of non-profits that are making a difference for Veterans in the BJJ community. 

This is the motivation. Hey,ever, you welcome to another episode of Jiujit Teel's coast to coast the podcast. It talks about what's important on at off the Mat, and on today'sepisode we're celebrating Veterans Day and talk about some amazing nonprofits that are doing someawesome work for the veterans and everybody else out in the Bjj community. Firstof all, I mean introduced the hostess, the cohost this with the most thiscul that's going on. Cuz How you doing tonight? I'm doing goodman. I'm doing good, dude, really good out here, just gettingI'm really interested in this, the topics we have going on today. I'mreally excited about Veterans Day and everything that's going on and kind of the toptopics that are going to be talked about. I also want to introduce one ofmy really good friends who's been an image Jutsu game also prior military.I'll let him talk a little bit more about that, but that's my boySteve. He's going to be joining us on the show today. How youdoing, Steve Good man? What's up, guys? Hey, welcome to theJiujit Didal Neighborhood Steve, what's up? Everything going, and I how's everythingon the East Coast? Guys, dude, it's awesome out here,as always. Man, that's what's up. That is what's up. So,Steve, today is veteran's Day. We brought you on because you area veteran. What branch of military did you serve in? Brother, Iwas in the Marine Corps. Man. Who? Yeah, we did youto choose that branch. If you don't mind me ask him. Yeah,man, absolutely, no. You know, I had some family, a lotof family, that was prior military. I had a an uncle mine thatwas, you know, he was a marine in Vietnam. He walkedalong, wow, he was a first Marine Division. He walked point inVietnam for thirteen months and you know, that's kind of what inspired me to, you know, to want to join the military. I had another presentof mine who joined the Marine Corp about three or four years before I graduated. So you know, I've had family in the army, Air Force,Marine Corps and that's just always something I wanted to do, man. So, you know, I went graduate high school, left for like like bootcamp like three weeks after I graduated high school. Damn, yeah, yeah, as in the military infantry, you know. So I was a realcrayon eater, you know everybody, you know, because everybody sees like ArmyRangers and all maybe we jumping out of planes and, you know, doingall the navy seal stuffs like Nas infantry man. We walked everywhere we went. So it was good man. So it was in the the Marine Corpsreserves. I was there for did six years, did a little a littletime overseas and West Africa. You know, it was, you know, alot of a lot of training, a lot of you know, alot of time in California, out there and West Coast up there in twentynine stumps. So it was good man. That's some great people. Had someof the worst times of your life in the military, but some ofthe best times at the same time too. So it was right, it wasgood man. You know, I got out and two thousand and sevenI think I got out was with my wife, or girlfriend now wife timeand you know, just just decided that was it for me. But itwas awesome, man, it was. It was a good time. I'mstill in contact with a lot of people that I served with. You know, being that spectroom's Day. So shout out to all my my veterans outthere that are tuned in. It's great to be on Nice, nice awesomeman a SI service in total eight year.

Well, eight and total. Everybodydoes like eight years. So you do who regard us a length ofcontract? You know, it's you do like your four years act of dutyand then you'll do four years like reserve. So I did like six years reserveand then I had like two inactive years. So but you know,I never got called back for anything. Luckily brought I. What were yougoing to say? CUSS? No, it's going to stay on. Likeduring your time in the Marine Court, did you have any experience of JiuJitsu or any friends, and we're in Jiujitsu at all? No, notreally Jiu Jitsu. They had like a you know, they just recently institutedlike what they called like the mcmap program and I don't even know if that'swhat the Marine Corps uses anymore, but it was like the Marine Corps MartialArts Program Uh Huh. that it was like a little hybrid of like kindof like everything. You know. They taught like a little bit of boxingsand throws. You know, some different submissions and stuff. I guests.So it's kind of like a little blending of a lot of things. LikeI grew up wrestling, so, you know, I was always kind ofinto you know, martial arts, are grappling. I said. You know, I should say so, you know, it's kind of you know, Ididn't get into Jiu Jitsu here probably to a little over a year ago. So, but I mean I had a little experience. I did alittle judo to when I was in college for a while, so that thatwas kind of really my first probably introduction into you know, any type ofyou know the throws and joint manipulation, submission kind of stuff. And whatgot what got you? What made you cross the line? In did youDidsu? Actually, man, it was my daughter's I tearing the in theduring like the pandemic their last year, with school being on lockdown. Igot, you know, just rolling around the House with my girls and justkind of playing like some games with them, you know, just having them,you know, try and seek belt ride me, see if I couldhold them, shake them off, have them teaching, teaching some take downounds and stuff and then just kind of ask them if they wanted to doit, you know, for Real, like going to class and do itevery night with other people, and they said Yeah, and so, youknow, we looked up JIM's here in the local Arey in Winchester, Virginia, where we live, and found shark pit Jiu Jitsu, where we're stillat now. So shoutout shark pit and everybody. Yeah, so we've beenthere ever since, man, you know, it's kind of a crazy world welive in. So you got to teach your daughters to carry the swordso they don't have to rely on somebody else to do it for him later. Right on, right on. That's what's so. Yeah, and sothey started doing it and I was like, well, I'm doing it too,he that's good. Yeah, man. And in our gyms, awesome.We have a lot of people like that there that, you know,their kids are in the kids class and the adults are in there, youknow, and I think it's awesome. We have, you know, Kimand warned Orf and her kids are there and I thought, because you know, Kim was there when her son Michael got his came out of the kidsclass, turned sixteen and got his blue belt. I was like, man, how cool. Is that the like to say, you know, youwere rolling with your parent, you know, to say, you know, wrongwith my parents when they were however old, you know, class like. That's pretty cool, man. So that's kind of been my goal,is I want to be there long enough that, you know, when mykids come out of the kids classic and say they were wrong with their oldman and the adult class lass and I that was awesome. Yeah, soto family activity, something that the family can bond over, that's fantastic.Absolutely, absolutely so. They now. Well, now, speaking of veterans, in everything, have you, how of you? Have you found thatjus help you in anywhere, any of those areas, being a veteran,or how do you how do you correlate the to? Well, yeah,I mean, you know, they're we have a lot of vets, youknow, at the gym, and you being one of them before you werebefore you scooter back out to the West...

Coast August. We have, youknow, a lot of vets that I've found out that they come there asa form of like stress relief. You know. I know people have beenable to stop taking medication that they're on for, you know, PTSD.You know, personally, like I find it a huge stress reliever. Youknow, you're in their role with somebody like if you're not concentrating on what'sright in front of you, got to get tapped out. So, youknow, for me, you forget about everything else it's going on in lifeand it just totally you come out of their man. It's like totally decompressed, you know, total stress reliever being a man. So it's it's awesome, man, right on and you and you definitely have that, you know, not only that veteran background but that law enforcement background. Song. Imean I'm sure you have the stress level of being a parent. You knowyour your background at being a veteran and also law enforcement as well. Imean sure you know that's a lot of stressed to be carrying on gailing theJIUJITSU's helping here. That's awesome. Yeah, for sure, man. I meanyou know we're an adopt a cop affiliate at shark pit, man,and you know, I was encourage any anybody that's in law enforcement. Youknow, it's almost like a mandatory. You know, it's you know,somebody said once like Jiu Jitsu is like brushing your teeth, man, likeit's mandatory. Like you've got to do it, and I think that's youknow, anybody in law enforcement out there, man, you know, find yourselfa gym that's adopt a cop affiliate. Even if they're not you know,they can still become one or still get, you know, helping payfor that training to get your blue belt, man, and you know the confidencethat builds, I think, in people, you know, to nothave to escalate force because you know, you know, you can handle yourselfand in a lot of situations just having that confidence, you know some people, man, I think it's something we need today in law enforcement. Dude, imagine how carried a gun and you have a blue belted Jiu Jitsu man, you're like a terminator. Man. You don't even need to leave thegun in the car. stoppable, unstoppable. Yeah, it's for reals. ForReals, I'm telling you, it's I don't know what they would do. Just bad walking around managed a bad man. Seriously, man, seriously, bad guys is just going to go back inside. Yeah, yeah,run and hide right. Yeah, hell, yeah, that's what I would do. Yeah, that's right, man, that's that's fantastic. We got anold coach to and Betel Borg's out in Marietta, Georgia, who runsa big adopted COP program and he works with the Marietta pd out there andhe's constantly running trainings with these guys. So he's got the SWAT team outthere, he's got the regular cops out there. Anybody who's interested in learninglook up and Betel Borges Marietta, Georgia, if you're in that area. Butjust like Steve said, man, look up any gym anywhere. Geton the Mat. It's fantastic exercise. You'll make some great, great friendsand your confidence is just going to grow and leaps and bounds, I promiseyou. Yet Mary to Georgie. They just had like a study they released, didn't they, like showing like how much like officer involved shootings were downand like all the benefits are having, like officer injuries were down, likeTaser deployment. You know what, Steve, I don't know if I'm supposed tomention this or not, but Umbertol Borges are old coach. was isor was in working with HBO, real hr Hbo Sports or something like that. Some some like documentary style reporting for sports. That's it's a show,that's a done on HBO and they went out and they interviewed him. Idon't know for how long they were falling him around, but I believe that'ssupposed to be coming out in the next like four to six months and theyare going to be talking about that study that you're mentioning. So yeah,man, that everybody should this. Should be doing this across the nation,across the world. All PDS. Absolutely, man, and a hundred percent.I think they're living their proof right...

...there. That, you know,why people should be doing it. DEREC, therey man extend. I know theGRACIS are big proponents of, you know, pushing that Info out aboutMary Atta Georgia. So that's kind of where I picked up. You know, I'd F seen it, but that's awesome. It's like a live leakright there. You're breaking news right here, man. Yeah, man, yeah, Jiujit titals coast to coast. That's what we do know, bobby. This is this is like a topic that that doesn't come up all toooften. You know, last year we did a veteran show and we justhighlighted, you know, the different branches of the military and we just everyonejust shared their different stories and what they took out and how Jiujitsu has helpedthem to grow as a person once they once they had that void from themilitary, you know, once they left the military, they, a lotof the guys, weren't sure what they what to do, and they feltkind of lost and a bitch. Somehow they stumbled across Jiu Jitsu and andthe rest is history. Has a lot of them would say. You know, yeah, absolutely, man. I mean our gym, like I know, our gym is, you know, the building the culture as much asthey're building a gym. You know, like those people are like family.Yeah, the brother has what it's all R and they, you know,nobody in that wouldn't do anything for you. So yeah, that speaks him.Man, that's a great gee. That's a great place to be whenyou could say that about your gym. You know what I mean, you'relike a family, you know, and you're welcome. So as I'm glad. I'm happy for you guys. Yeah, we have definitely great culture, GreatGroup of people out there. Man, it's it is. I couldn't.I mean everybody, from the the kids coaches to you know, coachJoe and Jeremy. I mean every one of them. Man, is isawesome, like I couldn't, I couldn't ask for a better group of people. Oh yeah, definitely, definitely. So it's awesome, man, I'vereally is. So it just a I mean you talk about having people fromall different walks of life out there too, man, like it's cool. It'sjust like the biggest like melting pot of people ever. Man's awesome.Well, that's good, man, that's that's good that you guys mentioned that. Did you guys feel that you can rely on each other out there?Because, you know what I mean, everyone goes through life at the wrongpace, by their wrong rules, and we go we show up to JiujitsuDay in and day out, but a lot of times we don't share what'sreally going on behind the scenes. You know what I mean. You sharethe mass, you share that intimate space, but sometimes that's not enough. Sometimespeople need a little more help. And Gosh, I don't eat CUZI don't even know how to segue into the next topic. So should wejust jump into it? Well, I think, I think. I thinkyou guys kind of both hit it with when you guys are talking about,you know, law enforcement, the different changing everything, not only is itchanging the way? I guess police departments are only handling themselves physically, howthey're handling situations physically, but I mean, if things are going and down,I think it also work. You're talking about the mental ability of,you know, anybody that's being involved in Jiu Jitsu, law enforcement and andotherwise. You know, you know even to you know now that we're,you know, at veterans. They were talking about veterans. A lot ofveterans are are going to Jujitsu. I you know, I can speak formyself. You know, we go there, we have that brotherhood. That isone seria there were looking at, and we definitely are missing from themilitary and we find that in these good Jim's, these good communities. Butit's also that, you know, I think Steve Been mentioned it to youknow, that stress they we it's taken off. You know, those thingsthat are not talked about, being behind that are behind closed doors. Youknow, they we don't really talk about a lot and or not brought up, but you know those anxieties, as you know. You know the people, you know guys that have PTSD and you know all these different things thatthey've held in for so long and everything. You get on that Matt and it'sjust, you know, you're able to just focus on Jiu Jitsu kindof let that go. And you know, one of the organizations, you know, that we're going to talk about tonight is we define and how.You know, you know they're talking to...

...watch some of the the videos ofpeople that are been part of we define these veterans and how. You knowthey're struggling with all these things and they get there and they get beat upfor, you know, an hour, two hours, you know, throughouttheir whole class, and then they just go back down into the world,like you said, many times you go back down to the world and it'slike not, it's not that serious. Ever, you know, things thatthey're dealing with, it's just not that serious and getting through. You know, I think you know Vetchan's Day, we talked a lot about. Youknow, definitely talk about you know, Betterman, suicide is it's a hugething. How about that? There it is, man, there it isso because you sent some articles earlier and you know there's a big stigma onright now on PTSD and anxiety and depression all over the world, especially withwhat we just went through last year. are still aren't going through with covidyou know, but for for you, for all those folks in the military, that's something you guys have been dealing with forever and yeah, it reallyhasn't been getting the attention and the help and the funding that that it should. You know what I mean? Like you see a lot of these guysin the streets that have these signs and they're living out on the streets andthey're asking for help and some of them say they're veterans. Who knows ifthey're not, you know, but because I remember going to the Va withyou that one time you got really sick and all right, yeah, Idon't. I did not appreciate the kind of help that they were giving youguys. I felt like, with all this shit that you guys have done, bent over backwards sacrifice, literally gave your blood, sweat, bones andtears for and they're just going to give you like this baby blanket of coverage. Nah, man, that's that's that's that's not going to cut. Yeah, yeah, man, you know over there, you know, I've beena being a medic in the military, like I've really seen PTSD's, youknow, since we're talking about that. I've seen it kind of grow fromwhere it was or for where it really was a stigma. Really was astigma for vesterans that if they had pet, it's St or if you knew youhad it or your diagnosed with it. It was kind of like a stigmaall you're out kind of push you to the side, you know,or within yourself. You just like Hey, I don't want to talk about it, I don't want to do with this. No, I don't.But then, you know, it was also those individuals didn't even know theyhadn't you know. And then, you know, towards like the middle ofmy military career, you know as a medic, you know working is trainingabout, Hey, these are the signs to look for, this is whatyou're looking for. And I remember one day it hit me as I waslearning what to teach for a class as the medic to my guys and I'mlike, wait a second, I have this. Oh, you know whatI have that? You know not. You know what this does. Andnext you know, it's like Nah, you know not. Now I'm fine, I'm fine, no big deal. And then it wasn't till you know, like you get home and you start seeing your family and you know,and I think you remember that this, you know, coming back home,being around you guys and everything, and people are like, HMM, you'renot the same, you're there's something different. So it's not just the the typical, you know, the guy on the street who's, you know,lost it all or you know, hey, you know the stigma being crazy,but also you know it hits you in a variety of variety of differentway as anxiety and you know, mood swings and all these different things.So it's definitely change in the military community, veterans of stuff, but how toidentify it, but also now the way we look at it and nowit's more open, it's more something that we can talk about it. Butyou know, it is out there. It is definitely something that is outthere and affects everyone differently and it's shown differently, for sure. For sureright. And so one of the articles you let one of the things thatstood out to me there. Let me,...

I'm finding the guy's name. Hisname was Keith Jennings and says here he's an Iraq combat vet and clinicalpsychologist, and this is what he says regarding like, this is what everyonefeaks of what happens when you go to the military. He says that narrativegoes something like this. American and American enlist, American goes to war,American comes back and he's diagnosed with the mental health condition or is broken somehow. There's this connotation that because they have PTSD, they ultimately killed themselves.That's a false narrative. So he says that's not really what's going on.And then you also sent another article. You know there's there's there's a numberthat go inside coincides with military suicide or veterans suicide, and it's the numbertwenty two. I wasn't aware yet, but I did a little bit ofresearch and they say that every day there's twenty two veterans that commit suicide.Is that with the numbers? Corresponds to yeah, yeah, so basically thenumber of twenty two is it corresponds with the then the number of the averagenumber of veterans that will commit suicide on a daily basis. But also it'sit's kind of like that hit number. So the way I understand it,it's not like some days it's more, some days it's less, but thatis that key number that we talked about. That is there were focused on thewe need to, you know, look at as on average. Youknow, this is what we're looking at. As far as veterans, whether it'syoung, old, new in the military, been in the military fora long time, veterans across the board. Twenty two is the number of individualsthat you know, you know, take that take that direction or takethat choice at some point in their lives and you know, we're trying tobring it down. I think we've seen some it's statistics that I've don't yousay? You that we have seen the numbers go down. So I meanthat's that's a good thing. That's definitely a good thing. Yeah, yeah, definitely definitely assigned that people are seeking help right, right, right,and so and and and you mentioned that. You know this this mental health anddepression and anxiety and spots of suicide there. They used to be kindof under the covers. You know, nobody really wanted to talk about it, but as time has gone on it's been almost a little commonplace to talkabout and then, and that's what we're we want talk about now, iswhat some of the help that is out there, not only for veterans,but for everyday people. So what the first nonprofit that I'm going to talkabout, it's not a veterans only nonprofit, is for everybody and I'm talking aboutit's called Hashtag submit the stigma and, like I said, they are anonprofit. They were founded by a young lady by that that goes bythe name of Aaron Hurl I'm not sure if I'm saying her name right.Last name right, AH, Gr Ellie, but she is a black belt underRuben Charles COLBRINA alliance black belt, bad all around Badass. Will taketime. World Champion, ADCC Champ, but he produced this black belt andunfortunately for her, she had a father who was battling depression and mental healthand he lost earlier this year and committed suicide. And after that she waslike, I'm going to do something about this and created this organization and basically, you know, you can donate money to their organization and it but reallyall they're doing is they're just trying to spread awareness, to let people knowthat Hey, this is this is like a disease. Like we talked aboutheart disease, we talked about AIDS, we talk about cancer, but mentalhealth and depression is a real thing. You know, I cousin, Iknow you remember that class that I used to teach with those boys who usedto mentor them, you know. Yeah, and we used to talk about likehey, you know what, how many of you guys crashed on yourbike where you're a kid, or crash...

...on your skateboard and you got ascar on your elbow and as yeah, all of us, and I'm likeyeah, it, can you show me the scar? And there like yeah, scars right here never went away, and like that's right. But whatyou guys don't realize is that just like we our bodies, can get heron the outside, we can get her on the inside, and those leavesscars on the inside, but nobody can see them. And just like ascar on the outside leaves you damage, those scars on the inside are alsogoing to damage you in different ways and they're going to affect your life ina multitude of ways, just like you mentioned a little while ago, becauseeveryone's going to battle these things in a different way, you know. Butthe just like a mechanic, the more tools you have in your bag,just like in Jiujitsu, right, the more sweets you have the more submissionsyou have, the more takedown you have, the more prepared you are for whateveris going to be in front of you, and this is just anothertool. So if you're interested, look them up. Submit the stigma dotorg by a patch thought on your gee. And really what they're trying to dois put up say put a patch on your gee, take it toa tournament, take it to your gym and someone's going to say, Hey, what is that, and then that's going to spark a conversation and thenthey're going to take that in. Hey, hopefully they'll keep spreading awareness. Youknow what I mean. But yeah, that's just one of the cool littleorganizations that I found and shout out to Aaron for starting this. I'msorry that it had to be started under, you know, these conditions, butagain, thank you from the bottom of my heart and I'm sure there'sall kinds of other people that are thanking you for this as well. Sohopefully other people take note of this and give them a follow. They areon instagram. I believe they're also on facebook and, like I mentioned,they they are. They do have their own website. So one more time, submit the stigma dot o Arg and they do have a handful of blackbelt jujit titles that are coming that you ride with these guys in flat andfly their little patches in the tournament. So check them out sometime. Submitthe stigma. One More Awesome, really awesome nonprofit that I found doing alittle bit of research, and this one is specifically tied to veterans. Soif you're a veteran out there you want to help, or even if you'renot a veteran and you want to help the Jiu Jitsu community, specifically theveteran community, look up this awesome nonprofit that I'm going to talk about rightnow and it's called geese for Geis and their website is geese. The numberfour GIS dot oarg. I'll be dropping this on our instagram account pretty soon. I'll put it in on our bio so you guys can check it out. But what you can do is you can not only donate cash for theseguys, to these guys, but you can donate all old Jiu Jitsu can. You got old geese in around that don't feed you no more, butthey got plenty of miles left. They will take them, wash them,because you guys are some dirty ass motherfuckers out there, but wash them,package them up, throw them in a box and send it to them.They will take your gee he's, any sizes, they'll take your rash guards, they'll take your gie shorts, weights, Matt's, Anything Jiu Jitsu or exerciserelated. They are looking for and, like I mentioned, they don't wantyour trash. So, if you can do your selves a favor,what and you got stuff laying around, give it a door and a washreal quick, set it aside and maybe we can send someone out to comepick him up, because I got some Gys, I got some note,some noogie stuff that I don't use any longer, and I'm going to washit up again, even though it's clean, but I'm going to wash it againand I'm going to send it out to these guys. Hey, makesure I'll Fozzo, was not saying any it's cup. We don't we don'tneed. Yeah, that's not that's not reusable. Knows that nasty as SouthFonso, we're going to have to go double check that box. All right, round here, talk about he's U...

No, no, Guy. Youknow what he knows, though. Man, I'm sure his ears are ringing rightnow, burning man dude. So before I um wrap this little sectionup, or this little segment on Gies for GIS, I want to readtheir mission, it says, founded in two thousand and fifteen geese for Gi'sobjective is to help active military members, veterans and first responders cope with thestress us of their respective jobs. Or Organization sends gys to those that havetaken the oath to protect us. These gys allow servicemen and service women tobegin and or continue their martial arts journey. The B Jj and martial arts communityoffers camaraderie and a sense of fellowship that helps both takers regain trust andmake friendships that will last a lifetime. Our hope is that recipients who receiveguys will use martial arts training as a form of therapy to help them copewith PTSD, traumatic brain injuries and hosts of other ailments that have led todepression, anxiety, stress and an ever increasing number of suicides. With eachkey we send out, our oath taker's martial arts community grows. So notonly are they spreading awareness about mental health, but they're trying to create a community. A Jiu Jitsu community involving the best of the best. Man,people who need help. People have bent over backwards for this country and nowit's time for us to give back. So, if you have some extraJiu Jitsu equipment laying around, loop these guys up or DMME and I'll I'llgive you some more info on them. But again, G Giese for GISdot O rg. That's GIS, the number for GIS dot O rg.What an awesome foundation. Man. Yeah, man, that's that's pretty awesome.I mean, I think that that's awesome. Not only are they doingit for the Jiujitsu community, but I mean for and also the Bega community, but anybody who sard when it's law enforcement fire Ms, that's pretty awesomethat they'll do that right. Um, yeah, that's pretty awesome. Yeah, for sure. Yeah, that's cool. And Yeah, you know, alsolike we define. That's another one. I think. You know, theyalso have the the they also kind of have the same mission. They'reout there to help veterans. They're out there to help, but they're butthey're also out there to also support and also bring in those veterans and notonly the veterans, put their families. I think one thing. Another wewe haven't talked too much about. We define, but that foundation, Iknow that a shark pit. You know, they support we define or they're actuallydoing. They're actually raising money for we defy right now and helping aveterans in the community and getting them into, you know, training and being asupport system. It's not just, you know, geting them into Jiujitsufor just the sport, but also getting them in there and their families tohelp destress, help, you know, get them into finding another avenue,finding that you know, Camaraderie, find that Brotherhood that they had in themilitary and how helping them they can better go home and actually be there fortheir family. I think that we defy foundation is definitely a great organization totalk about. Yeah, and we we had one of your guys as trainingpartner's cage, salvo, in here talking about we defy while back. Hegave us that awesome when whole Coogan rode the light number. Yeah, yeah, Coca Guy, I'll let you treated like a motherfucker next time. Followerswhole Coogan some color electrolyt you man. Man. That reminds you that.It reminds me of the race every time you talk about execution. Reminds meof the mud run that we did HES PTSDN US lecture. Were they electricto you? Oh Yeah, you know this one, dude, I'm worst. Bro. This one was worse because my cousin got through it with noproblems, no problems whatsoever. No,...

I don't you, dude. Igot like donkey kicked in the chest. It fell wait if but frank wasso adual he made it through it like it was no big deal. Iwent through it and I got kicked like right in the freaking chest. Wentdown and did a little. Did I know that I had a live wirelike two inches above my back. So every time I went to to getup, I got kicked back down into the mud. It was so badthat the DJ they're started like like started feeling bad for me. He wouldthe whole time he's talking, you know, trash up to everybody is going by, making jokes and laughing and everyone going by. His freaking mentality change. I think after the fourth time I got hit back to the ground.It was Oh, there was a horrible experience. Somebody come over help thisguy. We need medics over here. Yeah, seriously, man, someyeah, Frankie came back. Damn. Yea, I remember. Frankie cameback and he's like, don't get up, just roll, just just crawl forward, back down. I was done. Don't say, man, I don'tknow about all that. Man Getting electrocuted, I don't know. I'mAmerica. That's not fun, man, Dude. That was not fun.Yeah, that's fucking Shit. You paid money for that. Yes, Icould do that. We could do that. We could short sirface some stuff.You want to get it int you to, just give you twenty bucks. Yeah, and all we got was what? A beer after that,after we're done with all that fucking skunky ASS hot keg beer? And thenour legs were dead. Yes, Oh my gosh, thank you. Wedid me. What's that? I said, man, I didn't give you aTshirt or nothing. No, we got a BANDANA. That was yeah, where's that fucking Bandana? I think the best part of that whole dealwas at that night we went to we sports part tilty, yeah like that, and we saw it and we met Dan Henderson, remember. Yes,that's right. Dan Henderson was at the tilted kill having a party watching UFCand told us what's up? Yeah, yeah, shoutow Dan Henderson H bomb. That was for yeah, that made it all worth it. I wassure twitching when I met him. Yeah, we like, we, like star, still had madam, like you, still have we, you and awe. We was just because I was still having lightning shooting through my bodyat that yes, yes, he had tenzero bolts going through his blood string. Still, oh, man, yeah, that's only you're keeping me going.Yeah, I don't know, I don't know. I can't do theI can't do the electrocution, man, I can't do it. No,no, nobody needs to. Nobody'sh have to. Yeah, for sure not. But I think that was the last non profit that I had. Causeyou have anything else you want to add, Nah man, just you know,I think all this stuff that we talked about, I mean you knowtalking about, you know, veteran suicide. It is a big thing. Iknow that the statistics have shown it. It's gone down, but I thinkthat's huge in the fact that there are organizations out there. They aretrying to help veterans. A lot of veterans that are also trying to helpveterans on our own, you know, doing their own thing and helping abrother that the you know, they come across, you know, just talkingand building that you know, Camaraderie, brotherhood. But you know, nowwe have these Jiujitsu community has been reaching out the veterans. It's grown whohave all these different organizations that are bringing veterans in, giving them a differentway and another, another way to look at things and kind of build thatbrotherhood and also be able to who let go with some of the stuff thatthey're doing with or even the physical elements...

...that they've had. You know,they you know, they've got in through there on the military time. Theyyou know, they've had Jiu Jitsu there to kind of bring it together and, you know, help them through those things. So, you know,I'm glad to see the statistics are going down. I'm glad to see that. You know, there's there's all kinds of you know, people out there, organizations out there, there trying to help veterans, especially during this youknow, these damn crazy times are in you know, crazy times, andbut even though the numbers are going down, I you know, we still needto keep doing it. You still need to keep reaching out, stillneed to keep telling gets to zero we're not done doing our work. Jobexactly, exactly. So, yeah, we need to realize to I mean, you know, a lot of these people that suffer from PTSD, likethey're not going to be reaching out, like most of them aren't going torealize that. They're not going to be reaching out for help to you know, a lot of these people have, you know, luck. Yeah,that's from million. You guys are like. You guys have been under the youguys are like diamonds. You guys can be totally normal under the mostextreme pressure. So you're never going to crack, we're never going to seethat you need help like you're seeing, Steve. You're absolutely right, man. So even if you see every day, if you asked your buddy, hey, how you doing it every day, he says I'm fine, I'm fine. Ask Him every day, ask her every day. Yeah, yeah, I mean it's you know, a lot of a lot of people haveit like, you know, kind of transforms, it comes out in otherways. You know they're fine, but man, they turned like drinking oryou know, it turns into other stuff. You know, people like substance abuseor you know. But people just don't realize, they're not going toknow to ask for help. That's a problem. They're not going to knowit's wrong. So, you know, I mean I think even, likeyou know, we talk about awarens too. Of like, you know, afterlike twenty years of like conflict and being in Iraq and Afghanistan, like, I mean, you almost don't know anybody that doesn't know somebody like afamily member or a friend that wasn't like in the military or served or couldpotentially have PTSD. So, you know, people turn being aware or even reachingout these organizations, like if you don't know where to get help orwhere to start reaching out for somebody who does. To kind of get thatball wrong, because you know a lot of people are going to say,Oh, I'm not a counselor like, I don't know where to go,I don't know where to start, you know. So maybe look in someof these organizations too, because you know they're reaching out like to try andhelp these people's families to definitely, and you know you talked about like theVa. Yeah, you know, they're so overcrowded in and backed up,like you never know when you're gonna be able to get a family member inthere. You know, you can't count on that. Yeah, man,I did. You hit it on the a Q. I mean, youknow it comes out in so many different ways. You know that it's notjust I think I'll you know, even the stigma that you know, themaybe the normal civilian has a ptsd or veteran with PTSD. is they expectto see, you know, something, it's shortening. Use this huge change. It's crazy person soon or, you know, like you see on theseTV shows with it. You're you know where they're just going nuts and youknow they trying to shoot people or hurt people whatever. It's only it's that'san extreme case. You know it. PTSC shows itself in so many differentways from you know, you know anxiety, depression, you know key, youknow not wanting to be around people, you know isolation. You know itcomes in a variety for ways. I'm glad you hit on that.You know it. You know we have to be aware and I think ittakes you know, other veterans to also, you know, try and identify it, or family members. If you know that you're you're you have afamily member who was in the military and you're starting to you see some signs, to see some signs that they're a little bit different. You know,talk to him, be that open air, you know, or if for sureit's, you know, if he's they say, you know, seesomething, say something. It's kind of along those lines to right. Ifyou know what they you know, what's the saying that, you know,the same person that goes to wars and the same person that comes back.And you know, you said, you know, people say, well,you're different, you're different, you know.

I mean I've seen it in friendsand you know people that are you know, was in the military withlike came back and it's just like you don't know what it is, butit's there's something different about them, you know. And then you know it'swith any help, you know, and just nobody knows. You know,they don't know where to go. Definitely, man, this is just this it'snot normal to talk about. You know, it's starting to become normal, but it's not. And Yeah, if you're not an expert in thesefields and you don't know where to turn, to turn to these experts. Don'tdo go youtube and shade or googling something or Web and Dean and andbe like I'm good. No, talking to these experts. Get it,get a professional opinion, seek the help, even just going for one appointment orjust a phone call and then see what they say. Yep, yeah, for sure. You know, it might be somebody taking somebody else,another better who's been through it. You know, to talk to them too, you know, because, yeah, definitely stigma. You know, peopleare in the military. You know they're you don't get a you know,until recently, you know, there's no training on that. You know.I mean you think about like veteran, you know, in like engagements priorto, you know, the last twenty years. You know, Vietnam VeteransOr, you know, Korea were you know, they came back. Thoseguys probably had no help. You know, every thing. Like how many Vietnamvets are out there? Like man, think about what those guys saw andthere's like no, suppose no support system for those. Way they camehome. Most of the time those guys were like hated even when they gotback. Yeah, they didn't even want people didn't even want them back.Yeah, so, I mean they have it from, you know, bothends. That's it's it's messed up. It's messed up. So I thinkeven till recently, you know, people say hey, you know, don'tforget about these guys too. Yeah, and thing you kind of brought upto is that you know the fact that just because you're you know, yourfamily member, you're vetching, got out of the military or anything, you'renot seeing those signs right then there, you're not seeing them when you're inor right as you got out. That doesn't mean that it's not going tocome up somewhere else. It's not going to, you know, pop up. The anxiety's going to pop them so or you're gonna have that trigger somewhereelse that's gonna, you know, bring that out, that out of you. You might not even know it. You might it might take time,it might be something that you know, just the smell of something that justreminds you and brings you know it's it's not it just because it doesn't comeout right away. And you know, I think about, I really thinkabout like law enforcement and fire, you fire and the Ms. you know, you know your first responders. There's people you know they're in high stressurfy. You got lots of veterans that go into these, you know, fields, these you know fire, MS, police and or anything like that,and then they're adding and adding to it and then, you know, itbuilds up and eventually, at some time, at some point, it starts overflowand you start to see that. So, you know, I think, I think that you know, these first responders to stuff, you knowthe part there are veterans and stuff. They you know, they're affected to. Yeah, definitely. Yeah, yeah, and there's, like said, there'sa lot of people that come out of the military are in, youknow, the go to these first responder jobs to. So I mean it'sit's like a double whammy. Sure, yeah, yeah, in one warand into another, out of one warrant into another. Yeah, yeah,yeah, that's it. That's a yeah, that's a that's a good way ofsaying it. Yeah, you yeah, that never thought it that way.Sure, yeah, the damn it. Why do I got to make somuch sense? Sometimes it's hard. It's hard being right all the time. Man. It's Oh, well, somebody else and you'll take the reinsfor a little bit, take over, because Indians. You guys want toadd to this for wrap this episode up? Yeay, Ay, we've been takingcare of cousin aunt was out here. Man. We've made sure nobody's beenout here putting the third hook in on him, like Ha, thereyou go. Thank you for you know...

...what that's? We're gonna have todo an episode on the Third Hook, man, because of that's like us, the sack I link killer. People don't know about that. People thinkI'd be joking around, but when you get the third hook, you knowyou got the third hook and you ain't man, and if you are,then watch out. He came back like out here man doing all these differentlike guards, Cobra guard and everybody. I'm like, I was like,man, what is this? Aunt like, trying to submit him and it justnot working. Let me show you something, and it's just, youknow, he's taking me under his wing yet again. Hey, that's what'sup. Spread that Ravali Jiujutsu coast to coast, Cuz show Victor said,Vante is our good stuff out. So He's like, let me show you, I got this, I got you. We're taking awesome man, learning somestuff that's blowing my mind, man. I like some concepts and just blowmy mind and I'm just like, Matt, I gotta share it,I gotta share it. Yeah, Hey, yeah, that's what we that's whatwe do, man, spread that knowledge. But I can't share witheveryone at the gym. I've only picked Steve to share this with because Ineed you know, I can't let everybody know the secrets. Well, yeah, you unleash it. Yeah, great power comes great responsibility. And exactlywhen the BGJ fanatics DVD comes out, they'll know master Sir Hook. Sowell, Steve, thank you so much for joining us, taking some timeout of your night. Man, I know it's getting laid out there,but thank you for joining us, thanks for you for taking care of mycousin making sure that Third Hook don't get in there. Yeah, man,I appreciate thanks for having me on. Guys. Yeah, because anything youwant to say before we wrap this up? Yeah, man, just thanks forhaving me out again. Last thing, you know, if you're a servicemember or veteran or maybe a family friend or whatever, and you areyou do have a family member that is in crisis, a veteran, thereis a veteran crisis line. It's one eight hundred two, seven, threeeight two fifty five, or you can text eight, three eight two fiftyfive. It's twenty four seven. You can also go online at ww wveteran crisis line, dinet. Again, that number for the veteran crisis lineis one eight hundred two, seven, three, eight two fifty five,or text eight thirty eight two fifty five. And thanks again, Cuz, forhaving me on. Loved Love Be Internet. Yeah, for sure,man. We had to be shared some awesome information. Hopefully all you listenersout there enjoyed it. One more time. We defy foundation can be found atwe de five foundation dot Org. Submit the HASHTAG. Submit the stigmacan be found at submit the stigma dot org. And GIES FOR GIS DOTRG. And one more time. If you got some extra Jiu Jitsu equipmentout there or gies, rash guards shorts and they're just sitting your garage orin a jeor somewhere, let us know. Maybe we can pick them up whenwe can send them a nice little care package. That's off for today'sepisode. Again one more time, hope everybody enjoyed it. Thank you allfor listening. If you have some extra time, hit over to our websiteat www dot jug. That s to Secom, where you can find allour content. Until next time, you get that those cheap rolling and trainingif you can, and we hope to hear from you soon. Peace.This is the motivation.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (81)